Notes 6.13.16: Figure+Form, Works in Progress, Digital Art and Traditionalism

Figure With Red

Figure With Red

In contradiction to my New Year's resolution, I have been missing in action from this blog. I wish I could say that it has been all due to life throwing obstacles in the way, but that is only partially true.

Figure IV

Figure IV

Despite the aforementioned obstacles, I have managed to work steadily this year, so far. A lot of my time has been experimenting; there is a new series I am developing which I hope to unveil soon. I seem to want to do a number of different series. I can't help it; I have varied visual interests.

I also recently completed the 'sister images' Figure IV and Figure With Red. Figure IV, which originally was to be titled Figure in Red, went through a few metamorphosis before becoming what it is now. Ironically, Figure With Red was the result of a happy accident while creating Figure IV. Don't let anyone tell you the happy accidents are somehow lost with digital media; I have had many. When turning off some layers to check something, I turned off the wrong ones and liked what I saw. It wasn't quite a Figure + Abstract image, at least not where the series is now, yet I liked it so much I wanted to keep it and create more, and so the Figure + Form series was born. Though it came out of the Figure + Abstract series, the Figure + Form series will be a different type of exploration.

I have several, too many in fact, pieces I am working on that are in various stages from barely there to almost complete. Some of which (gasp) do not belong to a series at all.

Lately, since in recent years my work has increasingly become more and more of a mixed bag of traditional media combined with digital painting and photography - and I have been going deeper into digital painting itself, I have been thinking about how to describe or categorize my work. Perhaps it doesn't really matter in the end. I have to point out an excellent article I ran across: A Defense of Digital Painting (and Digital Art in General) by Eric Wayne. The article is from 2014, but very relevant.

Work in progress (detail)

Work in progress (detail)

Work in progress (detail)

Work in progress (detail)

I pretty much agree with every point he makes about the biased elitism, snobbery and nonsensical arguments made by traditionalists against digital art. Though Mr.Wayne's article mirrors my views exactly, he articulates them much better than I could. The attitude he pushes back against are unfortunately all too prevalent. I remember a certain photography oriented site I used to go to years back, full of the same self-satisfied elitist traditionalist types of photographers. I always found that to be funny, since there was a time when photography was a newer medium and the same narrow minded attitudes were leveled against it that today are directed towards digital based work in certain quarters.